United Kingdom

Test Project, using wearable technology, to monitor worker health and well-being in delivering a diverse set of environmental services activities.

  • Innovation

28
VOLUNTEERS

300
DAYS OF DATA COLLECTED

+60%
EMPLOYEES HAPPY TO USE A WEARABLE

Employee health, safety and well-being are significant drivers and Amey ran a competition for organisations to support us to look at this in more detail. The winning technology was from Italy and the medical technology sector rather than a sector we are familiar with and the project identified learning points for all parties.

Almost 30 volunteers from Amey’s environmental services in Wolverhampton wore smart vests that monitored their heart rate, respiration, pace, posture and stress levels. The aim of this project was to understand how the human body performs during different tasks in the working day. Volunteers, who came from a range of roles including waste collection and household waste recycling centre operation, wore specially designed t-shirts with a smart box to capture physiological data, for an average of ten work days each. At the end of each shift, the data was downloaded and a discussion held to understand if there were any events that could explain any fluctuation in the data exhibited. A detailed picture was built up of the health of each employee and their level of physical activity each day. This has highlighted some positive aspects of their work, including the fact that all crew who took part in the study performed within acceptable cardiac activity levels. There were, however, some areas of stress – for instance, when reversing a vehicle, working on uneven ground or in fast-moving traffic. Amey is now reviewing the specifications of waste collection vehicles to include cameras and on-board systems to minimise the stress associated with reversing and encouraging crews to report where they have encountered uneven ground to the council using the City Council App. Employee health, safety and well-being are significant drivers and Amey ran a competition for organisations to support us to look at this in more detail. The winning technology was from Italy and the medical technology sector rather than a sector we are familiar with and the project identified learning points for all parties.

Almost 30 volunteers from Amey’s environmental services in Wolverhampton wore smart vests that monitored their heart rate, respiration, pace, posture and stress levels. The aim of this project was to understand how the human body performs during different tasks in the working day. Volunteers, who came from a range of roles including waste collection and household waste recycling centre operation, wore specially designed t-shirts with a smart box to capture physiological data, for an average of ten work days each. At the end of each shift, the data was downloaded and a discussion held to understand if there were any events that could explain any fluctuation in the data exhibited. A detailed picture was built up of the health of each employee and their level of physical activity each day. This has highlighted some positive aspects of their work, including the fact that all crew who took part in the study performed within acceptable cardiac activity levels. There were, however, some areas of stress – for instance, when reversing a vehicle, working on uneven ground or in fast-moving traffic. Amey is now reviewing the specifications of waste collection vehicles to include cameras and on-board systems to minimise the stress associated with reversing and encouraging crews to report where they have encountered uneven ground to the council using the City Council App.

General information

  • Location: Wolverhampton (United Kingdom)
  • Client: Wolverhampton City Council